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Coming This Month

Notable November Indie Press Releases

Each month, our staff chooses several notable books released from indie presses and hybrid publishers.

Check out our top picks for the best new releases from indie presses this November - a mix of fiction, non-fiction and children's.

Let us know of any new releases you are excited about in the comment section below.

Happy reading!


Everyday Korean: Fresh Modern Recipes for Home Cooks

By Kim Sunee & Seung Hee Lee (Countryman Press)

The backbone of Korean cuisine, jang , has a flavor not found anywhere else in the world. The cuisine’s combination of savory,sweet, salty, and spicy flavors makes it uniquely delicious, yet there are few resources for those who wish to enjoy it at home. Until now. These recipes, packed with Korean flavors and cooking techniques, will open the door for readers unfamiliar with the cuisine. Who can resist dishes such as:

-Traditional and Modern Bulgogi
-Kimchi-Bacon Mac and Cheese
-Silky Sweet Potato Noodles ( Japchae )
-Plus kimchis, sauces, teas, sweets, soju cocktails, and more

Beautifully photographed, with tips for building a Korean pantry, drink pairings (from soju to microbrews), and menu ideas, Everyday Korean is the ultimate guide to one of the world’s most unique and delicious cuisines.

 

I, Parrot: A Graphic Novel

By Deb Olin Unferth and Elizabeth Haidle (Catapult)

When Daphne loses custody of her son, she is willing to do whatever it takes to get him back—even if it means enlisting the help of the wayward love of her life, a trio of housepainters, a flock of passenger pigeons, a landlady from hell, a supersize bag of mite-killing powder, and more parrots than she knows what to do with.

I, Parrot, by acclaimed author Deb Olin Unferth with stunning illustrations by Elizabeth Haidle, dips into the surreal with poignancy and humor. In this riveting, funny, and tragic graphic novel, Daphne must risk everything. Her quest is ultimately a tale about civilization’s decline, the heartbreak of extinction, and the redemption found in individual revolution.

 

Body Music

By Julie Maroh; translated by David Homel (Arsenal Pulp Press)

Julie Maroh's first book, Blue Is the Warmest Color, was a graphic novel phenomenon; it was a New York Times bestseller, and the controversial film adaptation by French director Abdellatif Kechiche won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 2013. Maroh's latest book, Body Music, marks her return to the kind of soft, warm palette and impressionistic sensibility that made her debut book so sensational.

Set in the languid, European-like neighbourhoods of Montreal, Body Music is a beautiful and moving meditation on love and desire as expressed in many different forms―between women, between men, between women and men and gender non-conformists alike, all varying in age and race. In twenty-one separate vignettes, Maroh explores the drama inherent in relationships at different stages: the electricity of initial attraction, the elation of falling in love, the trauma of breaking up, the sweet comfort of a long-standing romance.

Anyone who's ever been in a relationship will see themselves in these intimate stories tinged with raw emotion. Body Music is an exhilarating and passionate graphic novel about what it means to fall in love, and what it means to be alive.

 

The Ecstasy of Being: Mythology and Dance

By Joseph Campbell (New World Library)

Dance was one of mythologist Joseph Campbell’s wide-ranging passions. His wife, Jean Erdman, was a leading figure in modern dance who worked with Martha Graham and had Merce Cunningham in her first company. When Campbell retired from teaching in 1972, he and Erdman formed the Theater of the Open Eye, where for nearly fifteen years they presented a wide array of dance and theater productions, lectures, and performance pieces.

The Ecstasy of Being brings together seven of Campbell’s previously uncollected articles on dance, along with “Mythology and Form in the Performing and Visual Arts,” the treatise that he was working on when he died, published here for the first time.

In this new collection Campbell explores the rise of modern art and dance in the twentieth century; delves into the work and philosophy of Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, and others; and, as always, probes the idea of art as “the funnel through which spirit is poured into life.” This book offers the reader an accessible, yet profound and provocative, insight into Campbell’s lifelong fascination with the relationship of myth to aesthetic form and human psychology.

 

Balcony in the Forest

By Julien Gracq (New York Review Books)

It is the fall of 1939, and Lieutenant Grange and his men are living in a chalet above a concrete bunker deep in the Ardennes forest, charged with defending the French-Belgian border against the Germans in a war that seems unreal, distant, and unlikely. Far more immediate is the earthy life of the forest itself and the deep sensations of childhood it recalls from Grange’s memory. Ostensibly readying for war, Grange instead spends his time observing the change in seasons, falling in love with a young free-spirited widow, and contemplating the absurd stasis of his present condition. This novel of long takes, dream states, and little dramatic action culminates abruptly in battle, an event that is as much the real incursion of the German army into France as it is the sudden intrusion of death into the suspended disbelief of life. Richard Howard’s skilled translation captures the fairy-tale otherworldliness and existential dread of this unusual, elusive novel (first published in 1958) by the supreme prose stylist Julien Gracq.

 

Daisy

By Carmen Gil;‎ illustrated by Silvia Álvarez (Cuento de Luz)

In this charming tale, readers will discover the value of the experience and wisdom we learn with the passing of the years.


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